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Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

Posted by Blogweb on March 19, 2018 at 6:30 AM

Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

Paid for with his personal funds—for North America desperate to serve as a military leader in the Revolution, despite a royal decree prohibiting French officers from serving in America. Shortly after arriving, the Continental Congress commissioned him a major general and he became a member of George Washington’s staff. Washington commended him for “bravery and military ardour” in the battle and recommended him to Congress for the command of a division.


of course of the next years, Lafayette more intensely pursued the glory he so desperately wanted. The Continental Congress charged him with leading an invasion of Canada. However, Lafayette met with much disappointment upon reaching the launch point at Albany, New York. Lafayette earned another commendation but this time for “gallantry, skill, and prudence” from the Continental Congress. Lafayette managed to secure leave and returned home to France at the beginning of 1779. That he played an extremely crucial role in securing 6,000 French troops for the American cause. After offering to serve without pay, and aided by his Masonic connections, Lafayette received his commission but it was dated July 31, 1777,


He also adopted a strategy similar to the one General George Washington had used thus far in the American Revolutionary War, that of limited engagement while preserving his forces.


French Revolution:


On December 29, 1786, King Louis XVI appointed Lafayette to the Assembly of Notables which was convened to address the nation's worsening finances. Arguing for spending cuts, Lafayette joined the new body and on July 11, 1789, he presented a draft of the "Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen."Appointed to lead the new National Guard on July 15, Lafayette worked to maintain order. Protecting the king during the March on Versailles he sunk further after the Champ de Mars Massacre when National Guardsmen fired into a crowd. Returning home in 1792, he was soon appointed to lead one of the French armies during the War of the First Coalition. Held in prison, he was finally released by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1797. Largely retiring from public life, he accepted a seat in the Chamber of Deputies in 1815.

Categories: biography, history, economy

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